Mum who joined ISIS begs to return home with her daughter and says ‘she’s not out to kill anyone‘

IRISH ISIS bride Lisa Smith has insisted she’s “not out to kill anyone” as she begs to return home with her young daughter.

The former soldier, 37, claimed she “never owned a rifle” and did not fight for the terror group during her four years in Syria.

She was detained by US troops in northern Syria last month on suspicion of supporting the terror group.

Smith has previously spent a decade as a soldier in the Irish Army and then the Air Corps – evening serving former Taoiseach Bertie Ahern on the Government jet.

When asked if she had fought for ISIS, she said: “No, I didn’t do anything, I never even owned a rifle, I didn’t even own a gun. I didn’t teach them anything.

“I think anyone that knows me, you know in the army or outside the army or anywhere in my life, will know that, they know me, that I wouldn’t pick up the weapon and fight and stuff like that.

She left her home in Dundalk, Co Louth, and first moved to Tunisia before making the journey to Syria in 2015, where she married an ISIS sympathiser who later died fighting.

Lisa wants to return to Ireland with her young daughter so she can be educated here.

She claims she’s still the same person she was when she left the country.

‘I’M A GOOD NEIGHBOUR’

“I don’t want to cause problems for anyone, I don’t want to mix, I’m still me, I’m still like a good neighbour, I’m still a good friend, I’m just still me,” she said.

“I’m not, like, out to kill anyone, I don’t believe in suicide attacks.”

Last month, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar said Lisa can return home and authorities will ensure she “isn’t a threat to anyone”.

He said: “I know the authorities there will want to interrogate her to see if she has been involved in any crimes there. But it’s very possible that she wasn’t a combatant.

“But ultimately this is an Irish citizen and we don’t believe that removing an Irish citizen’s citizenship from her or her family, rendering them stateless, would be either the right or compassionate thing to do.

“As an Irish citizen, she will have the right to return to Ireland as will her child. But as an Irish citizen, it’s not just as simple as coming here and proceeding as if nothing had happened.

“There may need to be a prosecution there. And we’ll make sure that if she returns to Ireland, she isn’t a threat to anybody here either.”